Complete the form below to ask us a question or make an enquiry. We’ll get back to you via phone or email as soon as possible.

Insights

Abandoned holiday caravans

Posted on 24th January 2014 in Parks

Posted by

Paul Kelly

Partner and Solicitor
Abandoned holiday caravans

From time to time park owners will experience a customer abandoning their caravan at the end of their licence agreement because they cannot afford the cost of removal.

An attractive option for dealing with abandoned caravans is to either sell or scrap it. However before a park owner is able to do this they must follow a specific procedure set out in the Torts (Interference with Goods) Act 1977, “the Act”. A park owner who fails to follow the set procedure and sells or scraps the caravan may find themselves faced with a disgruntled caravan owner years down the line and the risk of being sued for unlawfully selling their property.

By following the set procedure the park owner provides themselves with a defence for selling or scrapping the caravan. The procedure is fairly simple and requires the park owner to send a caravan owner a Torts Notice. However there are specific legal requirements that the Notice must meet. Any notice sent to the caravan owner which does not meet the legal requirements will not provide a defence to the park owner, therefore it is important that a park owner ensures all requirements have been met before selling or scrapping the caravan.

A park owner should also ensure that they document each stage of the process such as keeping copies of all correspondence and proof of postage.

Before following the torts procedure a park owner may also want to consider making every effort to contact the caravan owner in order to negotiate a deal which will resolve the problem.

If you have an abandoned caravan on your park and require advice on the procedure to be followed contact the parks team by telephone 01392 207020 or email parks@tozers.co.uk

Company & Industry

Related Insights

Insights

Protection from Domestic Abuse

Posted on 21st February 2020 in Family Law

According to the Office of National Statistics in the year ending March 2019, 1.6 million women and 786,000 men experienced domestic abuse. The number of women and girls killed in England and Wales had also risen to its highest level in 14 years with a 10% increase having been documented. Between March 2018 and March 2019 there were 241 recorded female victims of murder, manslaughter and infanticide with 48% of those victims being killed in a domestic homicide, and 38% of those victims being killed at the hands of their partner or ex-partner.

Posted by

Sarah Miller

Associate Member of CILEx
Insights

Collaborations and mergers for sustainability and impact

Posted on 24th February 2020 in Charities and Social Enterprise

Collaboration in the charity sector is nothing new. Many charities already collaborate successfully with a range of other organisations at many different levels, for example, in the delivery of contracted services, where commissioners often demand it.

Posted by

James Evans

Partner and Solicitor