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Insights

Department for Health and Social Care issue a consultation on draft statutory guidance concerning the care charging reforms

Posted on 14th March 2022 in Probate & Wills, Later Life Planning, Safeguarding Vulnerable Clients

The government announced in September 2021 charging reforms and their commitment that personal care costs in England will be capped at £86,000 over a person's lifetime. This is scheduled to take effect in October 2023.

Posted by

Sue Halfyard

Senior Associate and Chartered Legal Executive

Insights

Small payment scheme proposed for vulnerable people

Posted on 07th January 2022 in Safeguarding Vulnerable Clients

When a person loses mental capacity and does not already have an attorney to help with their affairs, it can be difficult to know how to help them with their finances.

Posted by

Emma Ruttley

Solicitor

Insights

Will I need to pay for my own care costs?

Posted on 16th December 2021 in Safeguarding Vulnerable Clients

The prospect of paying for care can be very worrying, especially as care costs and people’s life expectancy continue to increase. The rules and regulations surrounding care costs can be tricky to navigate and this is especially the case where the need for care has not been anticipated ahead of time.

Posted by

Emma Ruttley

Solicitor

Insights

Proposed reforms to the charging system of adult social care in England

Posted on 26th November 2021 in Later Life Planning, Safeguarding Vulnerable Clients

STEP has reported that the Government has published more details of its proposed reforms to the charging system of adult social care in England, including a lifetime cap on the charges for personal care.

Posted by

Sue Halfyard

Senior Associate and Chartered Legal Executive

Insights

What to do when a loved one has lost the mental capacity to deal with their own affairs

Posted on 15th October 2021 in Safeguarding Vulnerable Clients

When a person loses mental capacity, they cannot usually put a Power of Attorney in place. Instead, in order to appoint someone to make decisions for them, an application needs to be made to the Court of Protection to appoint a deputy.

Posted by

Emma Ruttley

Solicitor